Mark Edward Campos

Fact-checking Mailbox

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Mailbox App has gained a lot of buzz in the last few days around the net.  Are they failing with their slow rollout?  They launched with a controversial and possibly brilliant queuing system to manage server loads.  This means hundreds of thousands of people have a glorified countdown app.  Hundreds of one-star reviews and angry tweets later, Mailbox official has been directing people to this graph on their website:

This graph screams fake math to me.   With so much hype, Mailbox, I assumed, would err on the side of more-information, right?  Like many others, I’ve become nearly religious in opening the app and watching the numbers fall.  I’m a glutton for numbers though.  I realized fairly quickly when comparing queue numbers with a friend that the queue isn’t faked in the app.  It’s the real deal – my position in line + the ‘people behind me’ added up to a brand new registration.  A) kudos to mailbox for releasing normally sensitive user registration numbers and B) I can verify this silly graph on the Mailbox blog and verify their supposedly nonlinear fill rate.

Over the last 3 days I’ve opened the app 34 times and taken 34 data points.  Data here.  I threw this into RStudio and this is what I got, plain and simple:

I was shocked to see that rate has remained 100% consistent during all of feb 8 and 9, and actually DECREASED late Feb 9th.  Today things seem to be back to the exact same rate as late last week.  Too bad, for a system with so much hype.  So when will I (reserved via text message weeks ago) see my Mailbox?  At this rate, next week sometime.  Here’s a graph showing linear-rollout in blue ( no reason so far to believe otherwise ) and user-registration numbers in red.

– Mark

 

PS. Analysis is very simple with lubridate and ggplot2. R code for full transparency here:

library(lubridate)
library(ggplot2)
mail <- read.csv(‘mailbox.csv’, header=FALSE, col.names=c(‘date’,’me’,’them’), sep=’,’)
mail$date <- ymd_hms(mail$date)
ggplot(mail, aes(x=date, y=me)) + geom_point()
ggplot(mail, aes(x=date)) + geom_point(aes(y=me, color=’red’)) + stat_smooth(aes(y=me), method=lm, fullrange=TRUE) + ylim(0,550000) + xlim(x,y) + geom_point(aes(y=them, color=’blue’))

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Pallet Planter

Architecture, Project

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The Pallet Planter project was born to provide a low cost of entry into urban farming.  It provides a cheap and readily available way for anyone to get ready to grow a multitude of varieties of plants.  The Pallet Planter provides three soil depths: 4, 10, and 18″ of soil for starting a  plant, medium sized herbs, and large food produce.  The Pallet Planter is currently undergoing rapid testing and development. Here is my process documentation.

 

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RapidType

Architecture, Project

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My studio this semester is called RapidType – and we’ve got a nice website set up to track our progress.  The premise of the studio is simple: make rapid prototyped structures both economically viable and aesthetically pleasing.  It’s interesting that the successful prefab structures today aren’t well designed, and the well designed structures aren’t successful.  We’re investigating both of these means and we will culminate in a fully fabricated small structure.  Track our progress at RapidType.net.

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Bringing Architecture Back to Life

Architecture

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I’m working now with San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to create a 3D reconstruction and narrative of Villa Stein, a Corbusier home commissioned by the Steins in Paris, 1926. Here’s a sneak peak of a 3D construction modeled with a photo reference. The piece will walk a line between historical reconstruction and 3D analysis.

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Ideal Workflows

Robotics

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For a guy like me, it doesn’t get any better than this. Prototyping threaded nuts (to convert radial to linear motion), prototyping software, and printing parts all in one video.  

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Angel Island Mapping

Architecture

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In 2008 I completed a project based on a detailed mapping and analysis of Angel Island in the San Francisco Bay Area.
The project draws relationship with Angel Island as a window into the past of San Francisco: 100 years into the past. The mapping then posits that if San Francisco is in a historical relationship with Angel Island, then Angel Island will be urbanized, and will be terraformed to deal with urban density like San Francisco.

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High Line Intervention

Project

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Also 2008, this project situates a Hotel, Gym, Cafe, and Dance Club into lower Manhattan.  Prior analysis for this work includes New York Mapping.

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Master Lock

Uncategorized

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This design project was born to understand the inner workings of the padlock, and to develop a notation system to engage the viewer and provide a guide to beat a pad lock.

Master Lock Final

Creative Commons License
Master Break by Mark Edward Campos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license are available here.

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New York Mapping

Infographic

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High Line Sonar from TapiocaSunshine on Vimeo.

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